Program
Time Session Speaker Title
8:00-8:10 Welcome Lingfei Wu
University of Pittsburgh
8:10-8:30 Invited talk Steve Fiore
UCF & INSciTS
Science of Team Science: Past, Current, and Future
8:30-9:00 Invited talk Jinhyuk Yun
Soongsil U
Quantifying Team Chemistry in Scientific Collaboration
9:00-9:30 Invited talk Fengli Xu
University of Chicago
Flat Teams Drive Scientific Innovation
9:30-10:00 Invited talk Dongbo Shi
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Can the Brain Drain of Elite Scientists be Reversed? Evidence from China’s Young Thousand Talents Program
10:30-10:35 Tea break
10:35-12:00 Panel Discussion
Patrick Park
Carnegie Mellon University
Jiang Li
Nanjing University, Dept. of Information Management Science
Science in Teams: Tips and Pitfalls
Lianghao Dai
Zhejiang U, Dept. of Sociology
Bu Yi, Peking U
Dept. of Information Management
An Zeng
Beijing Normal University, School of Systems Science
Erin Leahey
University of Arizona, School of Sociology
Donna Ginther
University of Kansas, Dept. of Economics & NBER
Yong-Yeol Ahn
Indiana University Bloomington, Luddy School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering
12:00-12:10 Concluding remarks Junming Huang
Princeton University
12:10 Finish
Introduction
The past century has been characterized by a dramatic increase in the scale and complexity of science and technology, growing specialization, and a transition from individual innovation to collaborative discovery. While this shift has been driven by a high expectation of “team science” that scientists in teams will achieve breakthroughs that would not be attainable by either individual or simply additive efforts, two problems at the foundation of team science need to be thoroughly investigated so this high expectation would not turn into underdelivered promise. First, the progress of science can be stifled, slowed, or unbalanced due to the challenges in the collaboration that can affect these teams’ capability in generating new ideas, and the bias in funding that favors teams assembled to apply existing paradigms to solve production challenges against those proposing unpredictable ideas the may alter knowledge flows. Second, the growth of individual scientists may become an overlooked topic at an age when most scientists spend considerable time working with others in teams, which is likely to constrain creative thinking, absorb individual credit, and undermine career progression. To this end, the steady increase in size and complexity of research teams presents an urgent need to understand how do individuals can learn and innovate the best in teams. The satellite aims to achieve a collective understanding of this problem, by bringing together scientists, practitioners, policymakers, and beyond.
                   
Speakers

Steve Fiore

UCF & INSciTS

Erin Leahey

University of Arizona

Donna Ginther

University of Kansas

Yong-Yeol Ahn

Indiana University Bloomington

Jiang Li

Nanjing University

Bu Yi

Peking University

Lianghao Dai

Zhejiang University

An Zeng

Beijing Normal University

Dongbo Shi

Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Jinhyuk Yun

Soongsil University

Fengli Xu

University of Chicago
Organizers

Lingfei Wu

University of Pittsburgh

Junming Huang

Princeton University

Patrick Park

Carnegie Mellon University